Work

  • Over and over_04, 2019  • mixed media on canvas, 170 x 140 x 4 cm
    Over and over_04, 2019 • mixed media on canvas, 170 x 140 x 4 cm
  • Gib mir mehr_06, 2019  • mixed media on canvas, 170 x 140 x 4 cm
    Gib mir mehr_06, 2019 • mixed media on canvas, 170 x 140 x 4 cm
  • collapse_01, 2018  • mixed media on canvas, 305 x 235 x 6 cm
    collapse_01, 2018 • mixed media on canvas, 305 x 235 x 6 cm
  • collapse_03, 2018  • mixed media on canvas, 305 x 235 x 6 cm
    collapse_03, 2018 • mixed media on canvas, 305 x 235 x 6 cm
  • Big_Warpainting_02, 2016  • mixed media on canvas, 230 x 160 x 4 cm
    Big_Warpainting_02, 2016 • mixed media on canvas, 230 x 160 x 4 cm
  • Warpainting, 2016 • mixed media on canvas, 60 x 40 x 4 cm
    Warpainting, 2016 • mixed media on canvas, 60 x 40 x 4 cm
  • Heavy file, 2019  • installation view at Kunstmuseum Winterthur (CH)
    Heavy file, 2019 • installation view at Kunstmuseum Winterthur (CH)
  • Unpainting, 2017 • installation view at the Art Gallery NSW, Sydney, Australia (AUS)
    Unpainting, 2017 • installation view at the Art Gallery NSW, Sydney, Australia (AUS)
  • Fred Thieler Preis 2017 • installation view at Berlinische Galerie, Berlin (D)
    Fred Thieler Preis 2017 • installation view at Berlinische Galerie, Berlin (D)
  • gradually_real, 2014, • installation view at Sydney Biennale (AUS)
    gradually_real, 2014, • installation view at Sydney Biennale (AUS)
  • gradually_real, 2014, • installation view at Sydney Biennale (AUS)
    gradually_real, 2014, • installation view at Sydney Biennale (AUS)
  • Revolution, 2013 • installation view at Kunstmuseum Luzern (CH)
    Revolution, 2013 • installation view at Kunstmuseum Luzern (CH)

News

Frozen Gesture

In 1965 Roy Lichtenstein created his famous «brushstrokes» and in so doing transformed the subjective gesture of heroic Modernism into a trivial comic drawing, transposed into the large format of a museum. The spontaneous movement of the brush on canvas mutated into a quote, the emotional exploration of depth morphed into a Pop surface in signal colors. The purported immediacy of the expressive painterly act thus became an ironic reflection on the medium of painting using the means of mass culture. This distanced and self-reflective approach had defined contemporary painting since the end of Modernism. It highlighted the fundamental elements of the image, such as the appearance of the colors and the pigment, the color fields and their limits, and not least the application of paint in the form of a gesture.

This gesture had long since abandoned directly expressing existence in favor of any number of different discursive strategies and painterly approaches. To this day, artists underscore the problematic nature of the impact of the application of color and are forever reinterpreting it – from the gesture as a semiotic abbreviation for painting through to its diverse transformations in images.

In the form of the extensive «Frozen Gesture» exhibition Kunst Museum Winterthur is presenting the sheer range of gestures in contemporary painting. The exhibition brings together important individual pieces by outstanding protagonists of Abstract Art, such as Gerhard Richter and David Reed, with extensive work groups of contemporary artists such as Franz Ackermann, Pia Fries, Katharina Grosse and Judy Millar – to create a fascinating display of works of exceptional painterly quality and inconceivable sensory appeal.

NEWS! Acquisitions in the context of the collection

Collecting art was what prompted the establishment of the Kunstgesellschaft Luzern in 1819, and in addition to preserving, exploring and mediating art it is still a major objective of the Kunstmuseum Luzern to this day.

News! presents new treasures in the context of works that have been in the collection for some time already. Thus the Bezauberte Knabe (Enchanted Boy) by Ferdinand Hodler meets Sharon Lockhart’s photographs of the Polish girl Milena, José Júlio de Souza Pinto shows how a grandfather teaches his grandson, while Laure Prouvost spins stories about her lost grandfather. Visitors can look into the starry sky with Ugo Rondinone and Claude Sandoz, take a walk in the forest with Hans Emmenegger, Robert Zünd and Jos Näpflin, or visit Cuno Amiet or Markus Raetz in their studios. This unfailingly surprising encounter between and with works is sensual, profound and humorous and demonstrates just how well the new acquisitions can be integrated into a collection that has existed for 200 years.basum

Gallery Exhibitions

Group Show (Adieu Gessnerallee!)